Sound plays a key role in Castle Rock, a sinister, meticulously-crafted series set in Stephen King’s dark multiverse.
Its sound is a blend of natural elements that feel eerily unnatural at times, and here, award-winning supervising sound editor Tim Kimmel talks about the direction for Castle Rock’s soundscape – and how they created everything from practical and suspenseful to supernatural sounds.

Written by Jennifer Walden, images courtesy of Hulu

Hulu’s new original series Castle Rock is based on the universe of Stephen King. The Maine town of Castle Rock has been the setting of several of King’s stories and there are tons of Easter eggs and references to his works in the show. But the story in the Castle Rock series is original — not an adaptation of King’s works. The series creators, Sam Shaw and Dustin Thomason, are credited as writers on all 10 episodes and so far, they’re doing an excellent job of it. Even King himself said in a tweet that Castle Rock shouldn’t be watched just for the Easter eggs, and instead, to “…enjoy it on its own terms. The cast is incandescent and they support a story worth telling.”

The show is successful in other ways, particularly the sound, which is truly a part of the storytelling. Sometimes fact is stranger than fiction, and in terms of sound, sometimes realistic sounds are stranger than synthetic ones. Castle Rock‘s sound is a blend of natural elements that feel unnatural at times, like the mysterious sound that precedes Young Henry’s reappearance in Episode 1 — a sound that has the townspeople asking, “Do you hear it now?”

Leading the post sound team on the show is award-winning supervising sound editor Tim Kimmel of Formosa Group. Kimmel won an Emmy and has been nominated for four more for sound editing on HBO’s Game of Thrones — including this year for Season 7, Ep. 4 “The Spoils of War.” Here, Kimmel talks about the direction for sound on Castle Rock and how they created everything from practical and suspenseful to supernatural sounds.

Read More